An assortment of atypical Cannes Reviews – from a sorry existence (1) to sheer brilliance (5)

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Find out more about each of these films by clicking through the title link to IMDB.

Spooks: The Greater Good (UK)
Kit Harington in SpooksTerrible and terrible where it matters most: the script and casting. I won’t write anymore other than this: the film deserves a star for credible action sequences and technical ability. I apologise for this inconvenience. 1/5

Amnesia (Switzerland/France)

amnesiaYou might just experience elements of amnesia watching this film. I’ve forgotten most of it and it was dealt like a blank deck of cards. Two interesting characters of different ages and backgrounds gently form a bond that will never become the reality that is perhaps so desired. An interesting starting point for a tale, but extremely underplayed here. The capital crime of drama scores the highest marks: passivity. One could potentially see the complete opposite: the films greatest feature is that real life can often be this boring! 1.5 /5

The Sea of Trees (US)

the_sea_of_treesThere is the jungle and the home. The events in the jungle feel contrived and painfully engineered, while the motionless flashbacks to the old procedures of a failing marriage actually carry some weight. Naomi Watts and Matthew McConaughey react together with a dynamic that is strikingly consistent with a floundering relationship. They are both great actors who can always go the distance in expressing a tortured soul, so while there is nothing we haven’t seen before, there is at least something special between them.

The film does not create a lasting impression. Given the plotline it should be a devastating film and under such circumstances it should linger. Why not? There is no secret ingredient that can answer this; it must surely be a whole culmination of factors. Though, in particular, the crosscutting to home and back didn’t have any effect for me, and the suicidal colleague of McConaughey was a tricky plea along with McConaughey himself relinquishing his prerequisite with death in order to take up an action adventure of sorts. Furthermore, the music melted over the top of the images like some ghastly peroxide drawing attention to it. It was not poetic even in its desperation to appear so and finally we can just say it’s all a bit messy. 2/5

A Perfect Day (Spain/Mexico)

the_perfect_dayA perfect day spent searching for rope in an armed conflict zone with the hopes of returning a humongous dead body from a deep well leads to no avail. This remains true throughout the course of the film, and whilst all rather a bit tedious, there are more than a few laugh out louds to be had, namely from the caricatures of Tim Robbins and Benicio del Toro. Robbins is wonderfully strong as a pitiful misfit, but stunning Olga Kurylenko is used simply as a means to be stunning and as cause for a little extra controversy between the groups. Though in most cases, the range of performance is significantly left unstirred.

A few poignant moments highlight the treachery and heartache of warfare, of which involve the caught-up adventures of a local boy showcasing his innocence. Although, still there is little to really focus us on these events and no real purpose is served other than the few laughs previously mentioned. The actors are enough to keep one engaged and the panoramas that encompass them duly create a nice spot of photography. 2/5

Diary of a Chambermaid (France)

diary-of-a-chambermaidLéa Seydoux is always remarkable and she is no less wonderful here, but it arrives amidst the unfortunately shambolic retelling of the enchanting Buñuel/Renoir classics. Célestine, the conniving servant, is irrational and lets her emotions spark the narrative in different directions, yet thankfully we are given the sufficient insight to understand the intentions behind such desperate actions; a tribute to Seydoux’s performance that does offer an enjoyable viewing experience. However, the situation of this retelling ultimately had it doomed from the beginning, it is near impossible to be unbiased considering what has come before. The design and locations are rich and fanciful and the film certainly has an allure, a voyeurism, and elements of intrigue, but nothing groundbreaking for French cinema. 2/5

Raging Rose (France/Poland)

raging-rose-crache-coeurThe opening sequence had me sold: thought-provoking work and a very dependable lead performance. However, the film quickly banishes a clear direction and tries to achieve too much with its interaction, yet this is not necessarily a fault and is made up for by an interesting take on naturalism and complimentary achievements in cinematic gallantry. A few instances of nonsensical character developments and other such flaws, but perhaps they are element to the bubbling rage and irregularity of being a teenager. Fundamentally interesting if anything else. 2.5/5

Sicario (US)

EmilyBluntSicarioThe film has its powerful moments from the extreme veracity and horrors of the drug trade to the subtler and more poignant performance from Emily Blunt, but it is steadily lacking in any resolute plot development or regular reason of events. To the films merit, it places us on the side of Blunt where we are forced to make sense of the bravado and corruption that make up the characters of Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro. We are constantly made to feel fear and anything deeper than this is somehow left behind. Blunt’s fear can feel artificial at times and perhaps it is due to living amidst and acting out too much fear!

The visuals lensed by Roger Deakins also carry the film and the layers of sequencing and viewpoints that make up the action are at times staggering. However, these scenes of car squads pursuing through Mexican towns for half an hour or so with their almighty presence lend to an action, or tension, that is overtly too consistent to have the preferred punch. A captivating fondue of warfare indeed, but missing something, a guess could be a touch of the human spirit: a richer connection between the lines of this interesting conflict. 2.5/5

The Assassin (China)

the-assassin-cannes-film-festivalApart from nodding off for five or ten minutes mid-way through (a merit to the films magic I might argue), The Assassin is a stunning spell of filmmaking that looks back beyond the ancient roots of storytelling and the moving image. Olympia screen one also has some cushy new leather seats, which are considerably appealing after an urgent and clammy stride down the Croisette seconds away from midday sunstroke.

The action is effortless and given a weightless quality that is retained by a strict and somehow expansive form of choreography. The characters feel re-born from 9th century China where the simple natured ways of living by the sword had reached their most potent. This is until our assassin becomes torn between the two worlds postured by family and foe, a conflict of dynasties and moralities. It is an efficient exchange of the cinematic language and one that lets it slowly seep into our growing hearts. The imagery of distant hills in the closing of daylight is also most pleasing (to wake to)! 3/5

The Lobster (UK/Ireland/Greece)

The_LobsterIt is easy to be split into two minds over this film. The better side of you says that this whole game is repulsive, gratuitous and demeaning to the human race as an entirety. Or, the satirist in you will delight at the extraordinary world that Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos is somehow able to so credibly postulate. I stand between each for different moments in the film, making for still yet an extraordinary experience. Whatever one says, you will find yourself in fits of rapturous laughter and then in instants of utter silence and contemplation. The foundation of our sense of place, existence and the societies that we have formulated as living human beings is certainly raised from beneath the surface and this might not be such a bad thing.

If we consider the human being as a matter of decadent specie, or in reverse, an extra-terrestrial life form that has just been sponged onto this earth, then we have no reason to take the character’s actions at face value. We can therefore laugh at their incompetence and thank ourselves that we, back in our own nurtured reality, are better off. This is one way to justify the means and the other is to accept a film as a film, and still more precisely a film in which the world (the reality) belongs to Yorgos.

The film kicks off with fiercely witty dialogue and immediately creates a dangerous territory of deadpan humour beyond our wildest imaginations. This continues and eventually falls off to be replaced with more piloting adventure and demonstrative responses from Colin Farrell who excels in such a role. All the performances definitely crack the whip. However, there is little more to the film than these escapades and the crusade of lampooning. The course becomes more and more unsteady, but that said, the taunting and deliciously manipulative last few sequences are to be bestowed upon. 3.5/5

Eisenstein in Guanajuato (Netherlands/Mexico/Finland)

eisenstein-in-guanajuatoThe film most definitely achieves one thing: it is “boxing for the freedom of cinematic expression”. This line uttered by Elmer Bäck, whose prodigious performance has more voltage than a bolt of lightning, is thrown back and forth between uncovering sexuality and the irate eccentricities that trump the traits of a genius. The film pays historical service to highlighting the constraints of a film industry concerned with an American audience and, of course, keeping the costs down! In one illustration, an important meeting with the head of a Hollywood studio is turned into a cat and mouse chase around Sergei’s prized chamber with items of clothing taking on a life of their own.

However, this film does not run away film industry tics and shortcomings. Peter Greenaway makes no exception to focus on exploring a man’s desperate search for identity in a world where the existence of film (in its hundreds of feet) is likely to contain the only meaning to anything. Some moment’s even form a satirical vantage point on the human sentiment, it is reached through the depth of Sergei’s character and is certainly open to many comical and very speaking interpretations. 4/5

Mia madre (Italy)

mia_madreNanni Moretti helms another sincerely honest portrait of late middle-aged overthrow and this time it is a female film director in an ever-brooding tumult over the approaching death of her terminally ill mother who does all the suffering. Despite the exploration of death and the pessimistic outlook on existence, the film is equally bursting with currents of joy and artistic freedom. The expression of John Turturro’s character seeks out nonconformity in the rules that apply to a film set and its rigorous motions. He is an annoyance to the director with all these foibles, but is also a distraction and counterpoint to what the director is really searching for – namely a truth and redemption. Turturro brings moments of real hilarity thanks to the sharp and clever dialogue that he navigates fully charged and by way of particular command.

Reality itself is inevitably put under great scrutiny. The film gestures towards a preferred reality in the medium of filmmaking and is definitely satirical to anyone familiar with the ordeal and magic of the process. Margherita, the director, is able to escape the fears awaiting her at home and launch her imagination elsewhere. However, this other reality constituted by the filmmaker is severely tested by the personal life and develops a very interesting mediation for telling a story with lots of laughs, perception and ideas. A director can smile on a film set and they can also look close to complete bereavement. The ending of this film suggests that it is the place to smile and that there would be little hope otherwise. For Margherita, and dare I say it in more general terms, being a film director gives connotation to an otherwise empty existence. 4.5/5

There are so many great films at Cannes and one can’t possibly schedule them all in or get admission. It is a dream factory of cinema exhibition, but it can seek to irritate, for example in the scheduling of four fantastic films within the same hour. Such is the explosion of filmmaking from around the globe and the riot of 12 days in Cannes to see 1200 movies.

Below are links to my two five star reviews/favourite and most memorable screenings this year.

 LOVE

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Thanks for sticking with the madness and joy!

7 Key Traits Filmmakers Can Learn From Entrepreneurs

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If you are a filmmaker, then you are probably already thinking: “But we are entrepreneurs!” Yes, filmmaking is a business and it has moguls that make it so, and consequently the independent filmmaker, more and more so, needs to act and think like an entrepreneur. You need to get funded, you need to build a team around you and you need all the traits listed below (or in my case, bits of them), of which I have found to be most commonly associated with entrepreneurs.

Let me begin with this rather unhelpful quote “entrepreneurship is dealing with repeated failure.” (I can’t cite this quote, but it has come from somewhere!). One would fathom that this suggests “repeated failure” will eventually lead to the good will of success i.e. you just keep trying to succeed. Of course, tenacity is essential, but this quote is probably hammering home the harsh realities of running a business, and learning from your mistakes. (My dad has forever told me to “learn from my mistakes”; he just forgot to tell me to write them down!). Making a film, getting represented, publishing a book etc. are all things that no doubt feel like you are receiving treatment of “repeated failure”. But, if you learn to deal with it and flip it on it’s head into progressive enthusiasm then it can only be valuable (admitted, we are not all this strong minded). Essentially, it seems to me that this is what entrepreneurship is all about: you need to deal with whatever is thrown at you and have an answer for it (commonly by “flipping it” – a term I have now made up) – thus emulating the role of the film director.

Passion

It was obvious, who can make something happen without passion? The slight difference in regard to an independent filmmaker is that they should be primarily fuelled by their craft and the story (much like an entrepreneur is for their product, however). You shouldn’t be so fuelled by the need to get rich, if so, you probably should be an entrepreneur after all. Passion, belief and excitement all come before money in this game i.e. the world.

Tolerance

A filmmaker needs to be able to tolerate a vast number of individuals all at once. Let’s hope everyone is on the same wave length, but if not, you need to know that you have control over the outcome. A big hamper is obviously fear and various anxieties; this could be fear of the ambiguous or the ‘Other’ hanging over your shoulder. Successfully controlling such a marvel will keep you right on cue.

Vision

Just like an entrepreneur needs to vision their product and its market 6 months down the line, so do filmmakers. It is easy to forget that at the end of the day, as a filmmaker, you are selling a product. Moreover, having a clear vision to bring that product to life goes without saying. For the director, to be assertive and maintain a state of control, you have to have a clear vision. Surely, if not, then that control would stem from something other than a passion for a vision, egos begin to come out and play. Tension between crew on a film set is the ultimate assassin for a director.

Self-belief   

Nay-sayers are what the cultural industries are all about; decline and more decline. Or, so it can sometimes seem when trying to get a project off the ground. So, overcoming such individuals and taking steps away from subjective dismay and into future resolve is a desirable and fundamental trait. These are understandably tough moments were support could be largely beneficial, but “rise above” as they say.

Flexibility

If you are in control/running something (as is an entrepreneur or a film director) then you have to be adaptable to survive. Arguably, one can be narrow-minded, bigoted to the heavens and still become the lord of a business, but I will argue that filmmaking can be more delicate (especially on set) and being flexible is vital. Being assertive to changes and managing them in the best way possible is all one can do at times. This doesn’t mean letting your power slide, your power will be all the more if people respect you for listening and become enriched by your compliance. The history of film directing is littered with debates around this topic (and the others listed), nothing I have said here is to direct you, it is purely personal thoughts and beliefs for my own reflection (with the hope you may like them too!)

Rule Breaking

Perhaps not a forerunning thought for a narrative filmmaker. Of course, innovative aesthetics are not the only way to be recognised, powerful stories are the significant other. Yet, with powerful stories, more often than not, comes a beautiful and ground-breaking aesthetic and the stamp of an author. I guess this trait is about being open-minded (to yourself, your DoP, Art Director etc.), in other words, defying some form of conventional wisdom associated with filmmakers (notoriously the classical Hollywood style of filmmaking that we all know so well). However, there is no set of rules when making a film (someone respectable said this, though I can’t remember who), so set your own and break them on occasion. Besides, creative choices, there are the guerrilla filmmaker rules i.e. break the law. This is another story altogether (Read Chris Jones’s Guerrilla Filmmaker’s Pocketbook)

Tenacity

I like to think of tenacity as having an external strength – the Zeus of filmmakers if you like. This is the eternal drive that keeps you going, the firmness in your belief-system that keeps you on track, the device that pushes you through the obstacles and defies uncertainty. Anyone trying to make something happen needs a degree of tenacity.

Underlying all these factors however, is the obvious and ubiquitous need for a strong mental state – nothing is applicable without such a device. And, this is where it all begins to get a bit complicated…

Thank you readers. Please share your experiences with these traits in the comments below.

Films of the Year 2013

After a slow start to the year with plenty of Hollywood drool, it’s turned out to be a truly impressive and diverse year for cinema. The summer had a couple of surprisingly good blockbusters (The Great Gatsby, Fast & Furious 6) alongside some nail-bitingly awful comedies (The Big Wedding, Movie 43, Identity Thief). Though, the fall has certainly been packed full of brilliant dramas (Prisoners, Captain Phillips, Blue Jasmine). There has also been plenty of indie flicks giving the industry a shove (always good news) – Fruitvale Station, The Selfish Giant. But, without further ado, here are my top 5 film picks from 2013 (bearing in mind there are still some eagerly awaiting titles on my watch-list):

Top 5 (in ranked order):

5. Blue Jasmine

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My number 5 spot goes to Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine. It is a beautiful and entertaining film with a sterling performance from Cate Blanchet. It left me with earnest emotions for Blanchet’s character and wanting to revisit the remarkably well-told story. Woody Allen is showcasing his impeccable ability to tell relationship driven stories with true heartfelt prosperity. Read a full review here.

4. Big Bad Wolves

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This film from Israel has wowed the festival audiences this year with its reckless ability to tell a black comedy and leave your head hanging upside-down. There are scenes of sheer horror blended with whimsical and innovative storytelling. The film is beautifully crafted and an absolute bag of fun for all genre fans. Read a full review here.

3. Rush

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Rush was the biggest surprise of the year for me. I was dragged along to see it and was left dazzled by the cinematic virtuosity and desperate to discover more about this great rivalry between two formula one legends. Admitted, I still care little for formula one, but I do love a great story, which this is. Whether this film is entirely accurate or not is besides the point, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Read a full review here.

2. Django Unchained

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Though it came out before the awards season, I still count this film as a 2013 release (because it is).

As a die-hard Tarantino fan I’d never been more excited upon entering the cinema, but at the same time I was terrified of being let down. Django Unchained excelled. I’ve never been a great fan of Westerns, but boy do I love a Tarantino Western! One can blabber on about how he rips of all the great stylistic filmmakers (Woo, Leone, Melville etc), but Tarantino’s work is fresher than ever. All filmmakers blend film history, Tarantino just does so well that people are more perceptible to it. It is the stories that count though, and they are absolutely unique – Django is no exception. The Tarantino style, which we expect, is there in true spirit, but it doesn’t get in the way of telling a great story.

During the film I was grinning with delight at its splendour whilst my eyes were constantly bulging with excitement. I can’t wait for the next treat Tarantino puts on our plate! A close shave from my number one spot.

1. Blue is the Warmest Colour

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My controversial number one! We film folk have always had a sweet spot for controversial films. It’s affirmative, this years Cannes Palme D’or winner left me starstruck. Abdellatif Kechiche’s direction is unadulterated yet striking, the performances from Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulosare are simply astonishing, their relationship is beautiful and genuine and the film comes together as this year’s masterpiece. Voila! Read a full review here.

Films that nearly made a mark in my top 5:

Captain Phillips trailer launch - video

Captain Phillips – a championing true story of a captain’s cargo ship being hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean. It’s a thrilling ride. Review.

Prisoners – this years chilling thriller of two girls who mysteriously go missing. Review.

About Time – my soft spot of the year. Richard Curtis sheds more screen delight. Review.

Saving Mr. Banks – a brilliantly told story of Miss Travis’s relationship with Walt Disney over the rights to producing Marry Poppins.

The Great Gatsby – a remarkable adaptation of Scott Fitzgerald’s novel that lives up to and adheres all previous attempts.

Stoker – despite criticism, it was chilling and full of the Park Chan-Wook aesthetic that we have come to love so dearly.

Les Miserables – it was just fantastic.

Lincoln – Spielberg’s ability to tell epic stories is just beside me.

Top 5 films to catch-up on (from preconception, they may well find a space in my top 5):

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The act of Killing – I’ve heard remarkably ruthless things about this documentary. I can’t wait.

Short Term 12 – I’m hoping for a little gem.

Nebraska – Alexander Payne is exceptional and his road movies are no exception. This should be a wonderful journey.

Inside Llewyn Davis – Lovingly prepared for another great Coen Brothers film.

Behind the Candelabra – Matt Damon falling in love with Michael Douglas simply cannot be missed.

Top 5 let downs:

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Oldboy – oh so sour…

Diana – rubbish, pointless, disgraceful…

Mama – it’s not been a good year for Guillermo del Toro…

After Earth – M. Night Shyamalan simply makes me want to cry…

Side Effects – I was pumped up for something far better from the Soderbergh…

There you have it. These lists may get updated over the next few months, but I can assure you, no matter how great people say it is, Gravity will not see the light of my top 5.

Now, for good measure, I wish to leave you with some wise words from the man of wonderfully cynical criticism; Mark Kermode reveals his worst 10 movies of 2013:

16 Invaluable Online Resources for Filmmakers

In this new age there is endless content online for research, teaching, streaming, shopping, literally anything. I wonder, who needs school?

I always refer back to similar websites for training resources, various articles and film industry gossip. Below is a list I’ve compiled of all my favourite (top 16) resources for the independent filmmaker. These range from sites to help you get your movie made to those that fill your mind with futile trivia.

Screenwriting:

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John August – Learn everything you need to know about screenwriting with John August and his team – it’s that simple!

Writer’s Room – BBC writer’s room offers lots of useful tips on the craft of writing and opportunities for aspiring writers.

Craft and Technique:

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Phillip Bloom – A productive site on cinematography and filmmaking run by Phillip Bloom.

Vincent Laforet – Legendary photographer and DP Vincent Laforet shares workshops, tutorials and reviews on his highly resourceful blog.

Software:

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Video Copilot – Andrew Kramer is a stunning visual effects artist who shares all his knowledge via insightful and entertaining online tutorials.

Red Giant Software – The most innovative software for filmmakers and a great community of visual artists.

Distribution:

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Short Film Depot – A great shortcut for submitting your short film to festivals.

Festhome – Another great submission centre for shorts and features.

Film Buzz:

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Indiewire – Essential for film fans. I could spend a week on this website.

Raindance – It may be a film festival, but the website is full of interesting articles and news for independent filmmakers.

Social Networks:

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Stage 32 – A great networking site for film and theatre professionals. Share projects, find work and get paid!

Vimeo – The platform for good quality videos, which is largely a network of filmmakers and videographers looking to share work, get feedback and collaborate.

Opportunities:

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Shooting People – Enter monthly film competitions, find out about events and read great blogs!

My First Job in Film – A vast database for all the latest graduate jobs in the film industry and a nice place to share your work!

Watching:

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MUBI – Bringing you a fresh independent film each day and expert critique, MUBI is simply brilliant!

IndieRiegn – Distribute your own films and discover a world of others.

It’s official: I love the internet.

10 Great Blogs Dedicated to Film

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Here is a list of great blogs run by fellows dedicated to the divergent medium of film. Indeed, there are plenty more than the ten listed here!

I aim to try and regularly follow at least 3. Take your pick:

1

Self-Styled Siren – Incredibly knowledgable and funny – this woman is the best film buff friend one could ask for.

2

Diagonal Thoughts Mostly political and aesthetic thoughts on cinema. Incredibly insightful and discerning stuff.

3

The Front Row – The illustrious New Yorker critic Richard Brody writes wise notes on the cinema.

4

Girish – The dedicated cinephile Girish Shambu has lots of well-educated opinions. Also be sure to check out his journal LOLA.

5

Reverse Shot – Online independent film journal published quarterly. The journals are packed with great thoughts and critiques on the cinema.

6

Senses of Cinema – Another online film journal giving flourishes of insight into theoretical and philosophical debates around film studies.

7

Some Came Running – Regularly updated, Glenn Kenny’s film blog is full of wit and excitement for the cinema.

8

Cinephilia and Beyond – Surely the best blog tumblr’s ever seen. Cinephilia and Beyond is truly dedicated to studying the art of filmmaking.

9

The Vulgar Cinema – A team of great writers come together every fortnight to write ‘off limits’ about cinema.

10

j.j. murphy – film critic j.j. murphy keeps us up to date with the wonderful world of independent cinema.

Your A-list Movie Cast

Lets say, you’re an agent with every star at your fingertips and you want to make a movie. Who would you choose? Actor, celebrity or even rockstar: the freedom is all yours.

My list would be as follows:

Hero – Harrison Ford

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Almost entirely, my decision is based upon Ford’s appearance in Indiana Jones. In my opinion, the greatest action and adventure movie out there. “It’s not the years, honey; it’s the mileage.”

Princess – Natalie Portman

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Ever since her mind-blowing performance in Leon we all knew this girl was a godsend. She would make a beautiful princess (not a skin-headed prisoner – aimed at you James McTeigue!); I could just imagine her leaning out of the castle tower.

Villain – Gary Oldman

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My favourite performance by this great actor is in Tony Scott’s adaption from Quentin Tarantino’s early screenplay True Romance. Oldman plays Drexl, a roughneck pimp, and, though short-lived, one of the greatest movie villains of all time (though there are notably loads!).

Sheriff – Christopher Walken

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This guy has an incredible filmography. I find him such an enigmatic and intimate actor. His screen presence is deeply powerful, from minor gangster roles (True Romance) to leading art-house gems (The Comfort of Strangers). But, lets see him play a Sheriff! (Last Man Standing doesn’t count).

Mentor – Harvey Keitel

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Or madman? Well in this case, I’d cast Keitel as a mentor, a man to look up to and to trust (don’t trust Mr. Orange though!).

Ex-Con (all round tough guy) – Danny Trejo

Danny Trejo: 'I started getting in trouble at a really young age.'

Who else? This guy has been in everything from independents to blockbusters and he really does have the most badass screen presence I’ve ever seen. He’ll fit the part for any bad guy role, including a psychopathic rapist (Con Air). Not to mention how many brutal deaths the poor man has had to depict. Many of you will remember the recent guillotined head of Trejo’s resting upon a scuttling tortoise in the TV wonder Breaking Bad. Trejo has done a significant amount of work alongside Robert Rodriguez; who else is eagerly anticipating Machete Kills?

Shop Keeper – Seth Rogen

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This talented comedian-turned-actor plays the perfect protagonist for a comedy (Knocked Up, Pineapple Express, The Green Hornet). However, if I had to pick a shopkeeper, he’d fit the part (it might be a hemp store…).

Stoner – Chris Tucker

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On the precipice of cannabis, I’d love to star Chris Tucker in a movie. It wouldn’t be The Last Friday or Rush Hour 4, but something more like Jackie Returns – hell yeah! (Where are you Quentin?)

The Neighbor – Steve Buscemi

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Why, you may ask? He is a remarkable actor and can also have a very creepy screen presence. From Rear Window to Disturbia what creepy neighbor hasn’t made an awesome premise?

Coach – Kevin Spacey

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A man of many mysteries… What about a less intricate (or perhaps not?) role of a basketball coach? Let’s hope Ken Carter doesn’t have him thrown off the court!

 Annoying Daughter – Elle Fanning

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Probably a trait influenced by my recent consumer addiction of Californication. Elle Fanning is a superb young actress. Her portrayal of Alice in J.J. Abram’s Super 8 is breath taking. I’d say she’s too lovely to play an irrational adolescent girl, but she is a wonderful actress, so I’m sure she’d nail the part.

That will do…(for now).

These roles are very standardized and wouldn’t necessarily appear altogether in the same movie. But nevertheless it’s a fun place to start!

So, what would your list be? Tag your post my movie cast or just reply in the comments. By all means add your own character styles – go crazy!